Debunking Psychic Myths# 5: Warning: Rev’s and Dr.’s

Reverend or octor

This may ruffle a few feathers. I speak from my opinion based on years of experience observing. For me, the word Reverend gives me the impression of someone “holier-than-thou.” I can also define a Reverend as someone that may seem holy, pious, and righteous. The word Doctor may seem very healing, medically oriented or Ph.D. programs.

When I see some Psychics use the titles of Dr. or Rev. before their name, I cringe. The reason for this is because most of the certifications that give those titles are easily purchased online. In 2011, journalist, Noah Rosenberg, for the New York Times exposed one such organization that defined themselves as an “online church.”

The customer of the “Reverend” or “Doctor” of Metaphysics certificate from an “online church” checked out via an online shopping cart. Surely that customer is using the services of a printer instead of an actual educational program. I won’t discredit any more educational severe programs. However, I have seen this from time to time, and my eyebrows rise because clients seeking a Psychic reading see this and are seduced into believing the Psychic has special or more advanced merit. That is my biggest concern with these titles.

To be a real church, it must have a congregation, a pastor, a place of worship. A real church and an” online church” use titles such as Reverend or Doctor. These titles give the impression that an individual achieved educational merit from a seminary or university. Instead, a piece of paper resembling a diploma was purchased from a website.

In conducting criminal background checks on applicants applying on our network, we noticed a Psychic applicant with the title “Reverend” had a criminal record for violating a restraining order. That was only 1 charge, and there were more charges too. That criminal record was anything but holy. The only sacred thing about it was my visceral response which “Holy Mackerel!

Surely, if a Psychic reader has special training that will be noted. Calling a person “Doctor” places that person on a pedestal. If you hear the term doctor, please make sure it’s an MD, DO, or Ph.D. doctor.

We had another psychic applicant years ago that used the title, “Dr” after his name. Sure enough, he spent time in prison and was on probation and wasn’t even a high school graduate.

These titles do not belong to Psychics. More importantly, they should not be used to determine if a Psychic is more skilled. On our network, we do not allow those titles because it gives this impression that one has spent time in a program above any other reader. It can be very misleading.

Sure, there are real programs out there for reverends of interfaith ministry. Indeed, they are more legitimate than purchasing on the online diploma. However, being a valid interfaith ministry has nothing to do with Psychic ability. Even in this scenario, we still won’t allow a Psychic call themselves Reverend. However, they are welcomed to share their educational and training achievements in a bio.

Unless I am walking into a church or speaking to a specialist in a direct capacity that involves their title, I will use it respectfully. Similarly, when a client is getting a psychic reading, they are looking for a Psychic, not a “Reverend” or “Doctor.”


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